Claude Monet Prints

Written by Serena Berger
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Claude Monet prints are archetypes of the Impressionist style, as the artist was one of the founding fathers of Impressionism. With Renoir, Sisley and Bazille, he would paint in the Fountainbleu forests, employing a style that differed too dramatically from the norm to be accepted by art critics of the time. The haziness and delicate charm of his Impressionist landscapes won him some immediate fans, but it was not until the 1880's that critics came around to see the beauty that we all see so easily today.

A series of Claude Monet prints focusing on the haystacks behind his home emerged from the artist's interest in the effects of light. Monet would often work simultaneously on many canvases, trying to capture the effects of light on the same subject at different times of the day. Other series emerged with the same subject under different light conditions, such as the Rouen Cathedral at midday and at sunset.

Waterlilies in Claude Monet Prints

Later in his career, Monet created a series of paintings focusing on the waterlilies in his pond. So great was his devotion to his work in his later years that he erected a studio in his garden so that he would be able to work without being exposed to the elements. One of his final projects was a commission by the French government--22 paintings of water lilies, which he completed less than a year before his death.

Monet once said that while other artists painted objects such as boats and houses, he wanted to paint the air that surrounded them. Claude Monet prints demonstrate this mission statement, where the artist focused on the subtle details created by changes in the surroundings. Monet's prints possess a quality of accessibility, creating timeless masterpieces that do not alienate viewers, but rather invite them into the environment that he sought to recreate in his work.


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