Mark Rothko Prints

Written by Serena Berger
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The most well known Mark Rothko prints are the artist's color field paintings. These are huge canvasses composed of bright bands or chunks of color, either complementing or contrasting with each other. Despite many other impressive works, it is the works of the color field oeuvre that have defined and identified Mark Rothko in the art world and to the global community of art lovers.

Early in his career, however, Mark Rothko prints reflect a style influenced by Cubism and Surrealism. He experimented with automatic drawing in an attempt to create art that was a direct communication from the unconscious mind. Birth of Cephalopods, from 1944 is an example of the culmination of his earliest period.

Mark Rothko Prints of Color Fields

In the mid-to-late 1940s however, symbols and scribbles began to give way to colors as Rothko's focus. A more meditative state replaced the frenetic quality of the drawn works, and canvasses the size of a room were subtle experiments in tonal shifts. While Rothko contends that each of these painting has a meaning, he would not even give them a title or discuss that meaning with fans or critics, wanting every individual to have a pure, singular response to and relationship with a given work.

This myriad of untitled color field works has become a commercial gold mine. For people who want to hang art in their homes, but are concerned with finding pieces which harmonize with their interior design and are relatively easy and comfortable to live with, Mark Rothko prints seem to offer something for everyone. From bold and dramatic compositions with red, black, and white, to gentle, calming compositions with pale pinks and pastels, Rothko's contemplative canvasses evoke every possible mood and complement any given color scheme.


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