Christian Dance Newsletters Online

Written by Jill Morrison
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You can find Christian dance newsletters online that will keep you updated on current Christian dance projects and other dance information. You can purchase newsletters from certain websites and they may be sent directly to your home or business. Some websites may also let you view their Christian newsletters online. Reading these newsletters is a great way to keep updated on Christian dance ministries.

Material in Christian Dance Newsletters Online

Christian dance newsletters online will focus on dance topics as they relate to Christianity and spiritual growth. Some articles may focus specifically on dance technique, while others will discuss ministries involving dance. If you are a Christian and are also interested in dance, these newsletters will be very enjoyable for you to read.

Many different Christian dance newsletters are available to read. Some newsletters are published weekly, some monthly, and others may only appear once each year. Newsletters that are available weekly or monthly will constantly keep you updated on all dance-related events and ministries that you may participate in. Some of the events may be performances that you can view. Others may request your involvement if you are interested.

Christian dance newsletters online are a great tool for providing dance education ion a positive format. Readers will be able to learn about dance technique and injury prevention in various articles. Most importantly, they will be connected with the Christian world of dance. Christians may discover their options in dance ministries by reading Christian dance newsletters.


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SBS FLASH MOB PROJECT. MAKING A DIFFERENCE ONE STEP AT A TIME.

Recently you may have heard a lot about Flash Mobs, as they seem to be gaining popularity with both ballroom and line dancers alike. So what is it that attracts so many to these gatherings of dancers that seem to just appear out of no where and dance? Audience suprise is certainly one factor. "Flash mobs are definitely promoting dancing to the general publilc. Just the inheret way in which they energize people to learn a routine and perform it in public is a way to generate interest in dancing," said Ira Weisburd, dance choreogorapher and the brains behind what will likely be one of the largest Flash Mob Projects ever. The project involves splicing together clips of videos submitted from around the world to make one large documentary film. Ira said. "For the onlooker, it's entertaining and clearly draws interest. Many who watch flash mob dancing on YouTube or see one up close and personal have expressed interest in taking up classes or participating in a flash mob," he continued. The following will give you an idea of just how well received they are.

This particular project began when Ira started teaching a dance he choreographed called
'Shuffle Boogie," at a local ballroom to ballroom dancers. "Apparently it was picked up and taught on a cruise ship by the activity director," he said. A group vacationing on the ship learned the steps and contacted Ira telling him they had been teaching it to a song called Honky Tonk. While searching for the song, Ira ran across Preston Shannon's version of it and decided it was perfect for the dance. Using this version, Ira filmed a group of soul dancers preforming his steps to the music and put it on youtube. "Within just 24 hours I received more than 200 requests from around the world to teach the line dance," Ira exclaimed. The next day he received an e-mail from Preston Shannon and his agent Dr. H. Hanna. Preston was one of the headline acts at the Hannaian.com Treasure Coast Blues Festival, and looking for a way to promote it. Ira had an extensive list of dance contacts available, including dance groups. "I knew that I could get these groups to make videos of the dance once they taught it, especially if it was going to be a part of a world wide project," he said. And that is how the Flash Mob Project was born.

It wasn't long before Ira began to receive 15-20 videos a day. These videos came from 40 different countries across the world. The dance caught on so quickly that its popularity has been compared to The Electric Slide. "To date we have received nearly 400 videos in less than 4 months," he said. Flash Mobs can also be used to create an awareness of other topics in a positive way. Ira began to attach human interest stories next to some of the videos. One of the stories about a dancer who sat out for 15 years because of reactions to the chemicals in scented products worn by other dancers received so many responses from viewers world wide, that the Breathe Freely Campaign was created to promote an awareness among dancers about a disability called Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. An instructor in California read the story and e-mailed it to his entire class as one of his students has M.C.S. This shows the large impact that flash mobs can have upon reaching the public. The final compilation of the videos is expected to take place early this year, but it won't be the end of the project. "I will be embarking on a Worldwide Workshop tour." Ira exclaimed. "My first stop will be Asia!!" For more information on the Flash Mob Project and to read about the Breathe Freely Campaign visit http://www.hannaian.com/sbsvideos/breathefreely.html