How To Calculate Weighted Averages In Grades

Written by Diane Sievert
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Wondering how to calculate weighted averages in grades? Believe it or not, you're not alone; learning how to calculate weighted averages in grades is a complex process and it can take a fair amount of time to get all the mathematics straight. Read on to learn more about how to simplify this complicated procedure.

A Guide on How To Calculate Weighted Averages in Grades

The first thing to decide when learning how to calculate weighted averages in grades is how much weight you want to add to certain tests or assignments. How heavy do you want to weight the final exam? How much is that big research project going to be worth?

The next thing you need to do is make sure your records are accurate. If you end up recording a grade wrong and then you weight it heavily, it can cause the student's final grade to be completely inaccurate. Be sure to take your time and write down the final scores carefully.

Once the scores have been recorded and you've decided how much you want to weight a grade, you need to do some simple arithmetic. You will need to multiply the grade by the amount you want to weight it, multiply the points possible by the same amount and then divide the weighted points possible by the weighted points earned. This in and of itself isn't so bad, but if you're calculating two hundred of them, it can get a little tedious; a computer grading program can do all that math at the touch of a button.


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