Teacher Resources

Teacher Resources

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Teacher Resources

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It seems no matter where you look, there are dozens--and perhaps hundreds--of websites that purport to make a teacher's life easier. The best sites post lesson plans shared by other teachers, ideas for lessons based on current events as well as areas for teachers to share their successes, frustrations and concerns. Many of these same sites also post job listings as well as ads for nearly every classroom supply imaginable.

Like the rest of the Web, searchers are not faced with a dearth of information, but an overabundance. How in the world can a stressed-out and underpaid teacher find the information he or she needs without having to weed through a million pages of chaff? And like the rest of the Web, the answer is deceptively simple: stick with well-established sites.

Commercial sites have much to offer, but they have much to sell as well, so be wary when visiting such sites. Many require users to login, which is a not-so-subtle way of getting your email address for future mailings or, worse, to sell your information to a third party.

Be sure to read the privacy information--yes, the stuff you never actually read--before signing your email on the dotted cursor. Some governmental and nonprofit sites also require--or, at least attempt to persuade--users to give out their information. However, these sites are much less likely to fill your inbox with spam.

Lesson Plans Online

One of the most useful features for novice and experienced teachers alike are online lesson plans. For new teachers, the posted lessons can be an invaluable tool. If you get stuck, chances are some teacher somewhere has had nearly the same problem, and has figured out a solution.

For more experienced teachers, the lesson plans can serve as a way to fine-tune already existing lessons, or to inject new life into ones that have become staid. And, of course, experienced teachers have the opportunity to upload their wisdom for the rest of the teaching universe to see.

A particularly nifty feature on several websites is the ability to request a particular lesson. Teachers who fail to find what they're looking for can post--21st century style--on a bulletin board. More likely than not, another teacher will have the knowledge you're looking for. This feature is particularly useful for teachers of less common subjects, as well as AP--advanced placement--or special education teachers.



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