The Importance Of Good Business Writing

Written by Helen Glenn Court
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There's no denying the importance of good business writing. It doesn't matter whether you're talking about a letter to a vendor, a merger proposal, a funding request, or a requisition memo. A single word does the trick--paycheck. If you want to either stay abreast or move ahead, you need to accept the importance of good business writing. Then you need to do something about it. Everyone's writing can withstand a little criticism and improving.

More than 80 percent of the executive respondents in a Fortune 1000 survey recently said, for example, that writing style in a cover letter is a make or break requirement for job applicants. Just as significant, fully 99 percent said that as far as promotions are concerned, a candidate's writing skills--good or bad--have a great deal to do with the decision. The importance of good business writing skills is simple. If you want to do well in the workaday world, hone up on your writing skills.

Breaking down the Importance of Good Business Writing

Writing is not rocket science. It's a matter of remembering a few basic rules and thinking before you write. Thinking does not mean struggling. It means only knowing what you want to say and not saying anything else. It means getting to the point as quickly as possible. Even if your writing isn't elegant, those who do the reading will appreciate your not burdening them with three paragraphs when three sentences will do very nicely.

What's more, all it takes to understanding is to look at a few examples of how not to write. Here's the bad: "In the manner that the enabling legislation structured community college finances, the legislature and the governor as a result of fiscal constraints, effectively limited the potential number and size of community colleges by shifting much of the cost of these institutions onto sponsoring localities and students." Here's an alternate: "The structuring of the finances effectively limited the potential number and size of community colleges by shifting much of the cost onto sponsoring localities and students."


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