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Atomic Clock Weather Stations

Written by Nicholas Kamuda
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For accuracy and detail, there is no better combination than atomic clock weather stations. Built upon state of the art microprocessor technology, these home electronic powerhouses guarantee pinpoint accuracy and up-to-the-minute information at your fingertips. Often bundled with rock-solid sensory devices (with no need for calibration), weather stations can make your uncertainty about the weather disappear. Automatic calibration to the national atomic clock also insures consistent reliability.

The pairing of radio-controlled clock calibration and indoor/outdoor weather centers seems perfect, because both kinds of devices rely on a base unit that is able to receive a signal from a remote unit. In the case of home atomic clocks, the home unit isn't powered by atomic means, nor does it keep time by fundamental atomic resonance (9 billion cycles per second, just in case you were curious). Instead, home atomic clocks receive a timecode signal broadcast by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

This is similar to home weather centers in that weather stations receive all of their data from remote sensor suites. The sensor suite, mounted somewhere outside your house, collects weather data from its constituent sensors and broadcasts that data to the weather station. Since both weather stations and home atomic clocks operate on similar principles, they make a natural pairing.

Calibrating Atomic Clock Weather Stations

While it is possible on some models of atomic clock weather stations to manually set the time, there is generally little need to do so. As soon you install batteries into radio-controlled timepieces, they will search for the signal from the national atomic clock. If no signal is received, the best way to help the clock's antenna find one is to place the clock in a window until a signal is received.


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