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Mounted Weather Station

Written by Nicholas Kamuda
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The best field data can be obtained from using a mounted weather station for data collection. Mounting the sensor suite in a well-exposed place can give you the accurate results that you are looking for. Fence posts make great mounts, and tripods are also available for many home weather stations.

For a thermometer to be accurate, it must take a precise temperature reading in both the sunlight and the shade. This idea presents a challenge in the design of digital weather stations, and also highlights the main cause of inaccurate data in analog thermometers. There are simply too many variables in sunlight diffusion to read the temperature accurately. Placed in an area exposed to early-morning sun, for instance, an analog thermometer can give you a wonderful reading first thing in the morning, but a biased measurement later in the afternoon. Placed too close to pavement, an analog thermometer will factor in the heat of the pavement and again give an inaccurate reading.

Installing Your Mounted Weather Station

The presence of so many x-factors in weather study explains why high-end mounted weather stations include some of the most well engineered components in home electronics today. In some, the thermometer and other central components are housed in a radiation shield to prevent unnecessary exposure. Installing these components in a location that catches the brunt of the weather with minimal human interference (not too close to a driveway or garage, for instance) can aid the sensors in taking accurate measurements.

Finding the right location can be tricky. Choosing a spot that is well exposed but won't present an eyesore can take a little planning. Rest assured, though, that accurate results are well worth the extra effort.


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