Weather Instruments

Weather Instruments

Articles


Syndicate content

Outside Thermometer

Written by Nicholas Kamuda
Bookmark and Share

Taking temperature readings outdoors used to be an affair full of approximations, but modern digital outside thermometers make it painstakingly easy and accurate. Hanging a small mercury thermometer in the kitchen window used to be considered a legitimate way of measuring temperature. However, the temperamental nature of mercury thermometers allowed too much inaccuracy, particularly inaccuracies resulting from sudden sunlight or shadow causing spikes or drops in the mercury.

On top of that, mercury thermometers prove to be sources of the dangerous methylmercury, which is the soluble form of mercury. If methylmercury enters the water supply and the food chain, fish that have been exposed to it may become poisonous to humans. Moreover, deposits of mercury, if caught in a fire, can take the form of airborne particles in smoke, and be redeposited, again endangering humans and wildlife.

Digital thermometers solve all of these problems. They contain no harmful substances like mercury, and provide accurate results no matter the time of day. Many outside thermometers are housed in radiation shields and come equipped with special fans to prevent biased data. The radiation shield is made of black, UV-stabilized plastic to prevent UV radiation heating, a leading contributor to inaccuracies in temperature sensing.

Installing Outside Thermometers

Installation for most thermometers is easy. A good place to get accurate data is reportedly the north wall of your house, ideally at 5 or 8 feet above the ground. Since the majority of remote sensors are wireless, and require no external power, installation is as simple as hanging the sensor suite, which is made easy with detailed instructions.


Bookmark and Share