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Weather Thermometer

Written by Nicholas Kamuda
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Digital all-weather thermometers are becoming the norm all across the country. Professionals and weather enthusiasts have used them for years now, but slowly, the technology is becoming inexpensive enough to be accessible to the common consumer as well. Small, precision-engineered, and often powered by a solar cell or single small battery, digital weather thermometers offer serious advantages to older, analog models.

Comparing All-Weather Thermometers: Analog or Digital?

When you compare analog thermometers to their digital counterparts, analog thermometers seem like exercises in approximation. Usually no longer than eight or ten inches, there is barely enough room on the device for increments smaller than a single degree. By contrast, even the most inexpensive home weather station includes a thermometer that is accurate to 0.2 degrees Fahrenheit--amazingly more accurate than analog models.

Mercury-based thermometers also necessarily contain methylmercury, one of the most hazardous environmental pollutants. There have been cases of outbreaks of mercury poisoning resulting from methylmercury tainting the water supply. Digital thermometers do not contain any hazardous materials.

Lastly, digital thermometers are great for their versatility. Recording temperature data with analog models required unwavering attention from an attendant, but digital models and computer connectivity make it easy. You can set alarms to sound at when predetermined temperatures are reached, and also upload data to the Internet, helping create a vast, worldwide weather diary.


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