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Evinrude Rectifier Regulators

Written by Nicholas Kamuda
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Evinrude rectifier regulators function as part of the electronics system of Evinrude engines, converting AC current into DC current. The electronics components that comprise the electrical system in an engine can only understand the flat, steady current that DC provides. Without Evinrude rectifier regulators to change the format of the current, many of the electrical devices on a boat might seem erratic.

Boats can also stall or not start correctly if there is a faulty component in the electrical system. Rectifier regulator, stator, or tachometer problems as well as simple issues such as wiring can all make troubleshooting an electrical system difficult. A good service manual, a little advice, and a peak voltage meter can make problem solving a lot less difficult.

Replacement Evinrude rectifier regulators can be obtained from any authorized Evinrude parts vendor. Comprehensive aftermarket manuals or Evinrude parts catalogs usually include charts detailing the compatibility of engines and component parts, including pistons, power packs, and regulators. If you do not have access to a manual, sales staff at many retail locations may be able to help as well.

Bombardier/ Evinrude, Makers of Evinrude Rectifier Regulators

Evinrude is a division of Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. Bombardier produces a variety of products for recreational use, including Evinrude and Johnson outboard engines, Sea-Doo watercraft, and Rotax engines. Bombardier leaped into the recreational products market in 1959 with the launch of the first commercially available snowmobile.


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1993 40hp johnson outboard charging system

I can charge the battery and i will be ok for a day. I have a bilge pump, depth finder, running lights and of course the motor.. It will still have a charge (diminishing) for about 2-3 days and it will be completely dead. The motor is not charging the battery. I have been told that it is probably the rectifier however I have not had it checked out. I have no idea how to check it out or whether I have to have some professional equipment to this. ANY IDEAS.