North Carolina Medigap Insurance

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Enrolling In North Carolina Medigap Insurance

If you are 65 years of age or older, you can enroll in any North Carolina Medigap insurance plan of your choice during the six months following your getting Medicare Part B. An insurance company cannot deny you North Carolina Medigap insurance coverage during this six-month open-enrollment period. After this time however, insurance companies do have the right to refuse you a new North Carolina Medigap policy, in some circumstances. There are close to 30 companies currently that offer Medigap insurance in North Carolina and many can be found right here online.

Important note., in July of 1998 a new law did go into affect whereby insurers are required to offer plans A, B, C and F on an "open enrollment" basis outside of the initial six-month period for those who were terminated from an employer-sponsored plan. In addition, if you drop Medigap coverage to enroll in a Medicare HMO or other Medicare Plus Choice plan, during the first 12 months you can re-enroll in the same Medigap plan. Also, if you first enroll in one of these plans upon becoming eligible for Medigap coverage and then cancel the policy during the first 12 months, then you are entitled to get Medigap coverage as though the open-enrollment period had just begun.

Enrolling in Medigap Coverage For Those Disabled and Under 65

There are different rules governing Medigap policies for seniors, then for those who are eligible for Medicare based on disability. Generally, people who receive Medicare based on disability may find it more difficult to purchase a Medigap policy. As of October 1, 2001 however, individuals receiving Medicare due to a disability may purchase Medigap plans A, C, and J during the open enrollment period.

After the period of open enrollment lapses, there is no requirement to provide supplemental insurance to those who are disabled. This law does guarantee the right for disabled individuals to purchase insurance who were enrolled in a Medicare managed care plan that discontinued its coverage, for 63 days after the termination. In either case, insurers can still impose premiums specific to the disabled population. What this means is that if you are disabled, the likely hood of your premium being higher is greater than for those who obtained Medigap coverage who weren't disabled.


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