Moon Phase

Written by Jeremy Horelick
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The moon phase on your watch's dial lets you track the month through a lunar cycle, which can be anywhere between 29 and 30 days. As the moon continues through its cycle, it reflects varying amounts of light from the sun, which is why we see various-sized slivers from night to night. With a moon phase, you can synch your calendar with your own view of the moon.

As you might imagine, this can change from region to region. Different latitudes and longitudes make for varying views of the moon, not only from country to country, but within a country as well. This is one of the problems with using the lunar calendar as an instrument for specific time-measurement. For that, there's no substitute for the solar calendar.

So Why Depict Moon Phases at All?

If you're not planning a lunar landing anytime soon, nor are you preparing to till your fields, why even have a moon phase in the first place? The answer, frankly, is decoration. You may not get any use from your moon phase watch, but there are a million other extraneous features you probably don't use either. When was the last time you used your stop watch? How about your built-in alarm?

But unlike a stop watch or alarm, your moon phase is a conversation piece, especially among watch fans, who will appreciate your style. And moonphases aren't relegated to 50-dollar timepieces you find in discount bins and on electronics-store shelves. Many of the finest watch houses in the world incorporate moon phases onto their faces simply for added style.


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