Youth Baseball Cleats

Written by Jeremy Horelick
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Youth baseball cleats are an important piece of apparel, regardless of their wearers' athletic ability or skill level. Parents of small children just learning the basics of the game may wonder if it's really necessary to spend a hundred bucks more to furnish their junior Bondses and Schillings with such "professional" gear. Perhaps it's easiest to look at it this way: what will it cost you in medical bills, hassle, and heartache to have your kid limp around on a gammy ankle for weeks or months instead?

Without youth baseball cleats, a lot of kids sprain ankles and often fall, which can lead to twisted knees, broken wrists (from the act of breaking the fall), and more. Cleats ensure that kids and adults alike have adequate traction when conditions are muddy or even overly dry. Most parents assume cleats are designed exclusively for the slush and slop, when in truth it's an arid field that's rocky or unyielding that can often prove to be a greater danger.

The Makers of Youth Baseball Cleats

If you've been on the junior sports circuit for some time now, you're undoubtedly familiar with most of the names in gear and apparel and probably prefer some companies' products to others. Rest assured that many of the brands whose names you trust such as Reebok, Adidas, Nike, and Mizuno also manufacture youth baseball cleats and hold their products to just as high a standard as they do their bats, helmets, and apparel. The last thing any athletic shoe company wants to face is a lawsuit for shoddy or defective cleats that precipitate falls, sprains, and broken bones.

As you'd guess, then, these companies charge a pretty penny for their athletic cleats. While a basic set can start as low as 30 or 40 bucks, the better-known brands can range anywhere from 70 or 80 dollars on up to 150 or even 200. At the higher end of this range, cleats are geared for serious athletes who can truly distinguish between gradations of quality and even gain a decided advantage by opting for one brand over another. For the junior leaguer just starting out, there's no reason to have 150- or 200-dollar shoes, no matter what your store clerk says.


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