Autographed Major League Baseballs

Written by Jeremy Horelick
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When discussing autographed Major League baseballs, there are several considerations one has to make, especially as they relate to value. The standard factors of abundance versus scarcity, quality or condition, and authenticity all apply when valuing autographed Major League baseballs, as does the presentation of the signature. Many balls are sold completely independent of a display case or ball-holder, which can detract from their overall worth.

Packaging is also a mark of credibility, which, in the autograph category of collecting, is of utmost importance. After all, while it's hard to forge an authentic uniform that was worn in Yankee Stadium, Comiskey Park, or Fenway, anyone can produce his or her own autographed knockoff Rawlings. Sellers who present their baseballs in legitimate holders and cases tell you a thing or two about their reputation, which in turn helps safeguard against fakes.

Sizing Up Autographed Major League Baseballs

Look around any online memorabilia site or auction webpage and you'll see autographed Major League baseballs ranging from five and 10 bucks through several thousand dollars. The signature of a relative unknown might land you a few dollars, but you're better off saving it in the hope that your signer will one day break out and begin to command big bucks for his merchandise. On the other hand, you might just want to save it as a reminder of the one player who was kind enough to sign for you when his teammates were too busy to do so.

At the other end of the spectrum are old-time balls signed by championship teams. A ball signed by every member of the 1955 Brooklyn Dodgers is likely to garner much more interest than a ball signed by any one of its players, even Jackie Robinson or Sandy Koufax. Memorabilia of this stature really has no upper limit to its value, as there is always another collector out there willing to pay top dollar for one-of-kind items.


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